Do You Need LinkedIn? Yes…Yes, You Do And Here is Why

People often tell me that they don’t use LinkedIn. They may have an account that they set up a long time ago, but they don’t remember what their password is, and they haven’t looked at it for years. They think they don’t need it. They are wrong.

Here are the typical comments I hear:  “I am a teacher…I don’t need LinkedIn.” “I am in business on my own…I have a website…I don’t need LinkedIn.” “I am not looking for a job…I am very satisfied where I am. I don’t need LinkedIn.” And so it goes. Everyone is wrong!

To those who believe that they are exempt from needing a LinkedIn profile that is fully optimized and ready for”prime time,” I cannot put it more plainly. You are just wrong! (Or, to quote one of my favorite Big Bang Theory TV characters, “You couldn’t be more wrong.”)

Everyone should be using LinkedIn. Period.

Just as billions of you around the world use and enjoy Facebook for family, friends, and fun, your LinkedIn profile is the virtual and literal “link” between you and the rest of the professional working world. Whether you are looking for a job or happily employed where you plan to stay until you retire, you need a fully optimized LinkedIn profile!

Why am I so passionate about this? As a Career Transition and Job Search Coach to teachers who are burnt-out and are looking to springboard into the business world as well as mid-career professionals who find themselves at a career crossroads for any of a variety of reasons, I believe that LinkedIn is rapidly becoming your new, online resume. Just as everyone needs to be able to present an up-to-date hard copy resume of their work experience, everyone needs an up-to-date and fully optimized LinkedIn profile.

I offer webinars and presentations on LinkedIn profile optimization, and I provide critiques of LinkedIn profiles for those who want advice on how to make the most of the features that LinkedIn provides. (My next webinar on LinkedIn Profile Optimization is next week, Thursday, July 21 at 7:00 p.m. EDT. To register, click here.)

In that webinar, I teach attendees the basics regarding what elements to include in a fully optimized LinkedIn profile starting with their photo. Frankly, I am stunned by the photos that some people use on their LinkedIn profile. They apparently don’t appreciate that LinkedIn is not Facebook. It is not Twitter. Nor it is Instagram, Pinterest, Snapchat or any other totally completely “social” social platform. LinkedIn is a social platform for professionals. Its express purpose is to allow professional people from all over the world to be able to connect with one another on a professional level and to network in a professional manner.

LinkedIn is where you can showcase yourself as a professional or as an entrepreneur in ways that you cannot duplicate anywhere as easily.

If you aren’t sure what you need to include to provide an optimized LinkedIn profile, I have had a graphic designer create a 14-point checklist designed just for my clients. It is graphically beautiful, but it also includes the practical and pragmatic graphics that convey how you can create a LinkedIn profile that includes the most important elements starting with your photo, your headline, your number of connections, and the need for you to customize your URL. I am offering it for only $1 even though I believe it is worth much more. This guide helps users understand exactly where everything should go and why.

Stress Self-Assessment

No matter where you are on the career continuum, you may want to give this unique, one-of-a-kind LinkedIn Profile Highlights Checklist a look.

Since it is only $1, you have no reason not to take advantage of it.

But if you aren’t yet convinced that you need to be setting up a LinkedIn profile, take a look at some startling facts:

  • Over 430 million LinkedIn users around the world to date and growing by…
  • 2 new members every 2 seconds.
  • Over 128 million users in the United States alone
  • Over 106 monthly unique visiting LinkedIn members
  • LinkedIn is used in over 200 countries and territories in…
  • Over 20 languages
  • 70% of users are outside the United States
  • 94% recruiters are using LinkedIn to look for talent
  • There are 6.5 million active job listings on LinkedIn

Need I say more?

If you remain unconvinced, consider this one last fact of life. Nothing ever remains the same. You may be happily employed today, and your job might disappear tomorrow. It happens. Companies merge, and departments are phased out. Jobs are eliminated. Workforces are downsized. I know one man whose company decided to move across the country. He was invited to go along, but he chose to stay put for personal reasons. He had no idea how hard it might be for him to find an equivalent position in a speedy fashion. He had to start his job search from scratch and try to get it from 0 to 60 mph in a hurry. Had he been keeping his resume up to date and his LinkedIn profile optimized and ready, he could have shaved weeks off his search.

I don’t have to tell you that we live in precarious times. Nothing is guaranteed. Right now, however, I believe I can safely say that if you don’t think you need a LinkedIn profile, you are simply wrong, my friend. So why not fix it and get started on your profile right away?

Order your LinkedIn Profile Highlights Checklist and get started.

Why Teachers are Leaving, and Why We Should All Care


As another school year winds down, I find myself communicating with dozens of teachers each week either by phone or email. The conversations run along similar lines, and the theme remains consistent:  “I love my kids. If I could just teach, I would be happy to continue, but there is more to it than loving kids, and I just can’t do it anymore. Can you help me?”

This conversation breaks my heart every time I engage in it, but I do so because I want to help those teachers who are experiencing the pain and heartache of burnout.

Without exception, the individual with whom I find myself talking is smart and talented and started out with high expectations and pure intentions. Each one once had a sincere desire to be a great teacher. The experience of each person I have talked to has varied from five to 26 years. Some have been in one school, and others have been in different schools, but the story lines are similar regardless of whether the teacher in question is calling from Chicago, New York, Los Angeles, Orlando, or Richmond, VA. “I just can’t do it anymore. Can you help me?”

unhappyteacher

I tell each of them that I can relate. I left public education after being one of its fiercest advocates four years ago. I took early (I mean early) retirement because the idea of returning to a classroom to teach to curriculum standards I didn’t believe in and administering tests that are a travesty were unpalatable options for me. I left teaching and public education prematurely because I was burned out after four years as President of the Virginia Education Association. In part, I left because I knew I didn’t have the physical energy or stamina to take on teaching middle school English. I hadn’t taught English since 1980! Mostly, I retired early because I didn’t have any desire to participate in a system that I believe is counter to what is in the best interest of children.

So I quit–I took early retirement–and I now help others leave the profession sooner than they had thought they would so that they can discover what other career paths they can pursue instead.

My new mission in life is to help others accomplish what I have managed to accomplish for myself:  find work that plays to their natural strengths, their talents, and their natural abilities.

Work shouldn’t feel like such a chore.

Are you experiencing teacher burnout? Not sure? Download the 7 signs of teacher burnout by clicking on the button below.

For the 7 Signs of Teacher Burnout Click Here

For those who are not teachers, here is why you should care about the epidemic of teacher burnout that is rampant and affecting teachers all over the country. If they all decide to quit, and the ones who are eligible all retire in the next few years, who will be left to teach?

Charter schools have become the rage, but they haven’t delivered in spite of all the hype about them. I don’t believe they are the answer.

And even if charter schools, private schools, and virtual schools were suddenly to provide the answer, they cannot possibly address all of the needs of all of the children who currently have a barely surviving public system to support them.

I worry about the future of public education in the country, but I am dedicated to the individual teachers who call me asking for my help. On a macro level, I think we are about to experience a teacher shortage of epic proportions. I worry that no one seems to care.

On a micro level, however, life is too short to spend it doing something you don’t enjoy…no matter what it is.

If you are a teacher experiencing the pain of teacher burnout and stress, here is a “cheat sheet” of suggestions for how you might better manage the stress of your current situation. Click on the button below:

For the 7 Signs of Teacher Burnout Click Here (1)

Whether you are a parent, a grandparent, or just a citizen with a passing interest in what is happening in the world, I believe you should care about what is happening to our teachers and in our nation’s schools. The grinding nature of the job has become too much for too many, and they are looking for a way to escape. I am here to help them, but I also worry about the vacuum that is being left in the wake of their leaving.

We should all care about what is happening to public education in our country…before it is too late.